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Bushfire

Current Declarations

Fire Danger Period

In effect till 1 May 2018.
Find out more at the CFA Website.

Warnings/Alerts & Info

Radio & TV

ABC 774 AM, 3AW 693 AM, Plenty Valley FM 88.6 FM and Sky News TV.
Visit Emergency Management Victoria for a full list of broadcasters

VicEmergency Website

CFA and DELWP Website

Phone

In extreme situations your landline or mobile phone may be used to deliver a critical warning.
For more information visit the Emergency Alert website

VicEmergency Hotline

VicEmergency App

Get it on your Android device
Get it on your iOS device

Social media

Twitter @CFA_Updates and Facebook

Banyule is impacted by declared fire seasons, which occur every year and last an average of four months (usually December through to April).

The greatest threat of bushfire is from the north and north-west where fire may enter Banyule from the Shire of Nillumbik and/or the City of Whittlesea.

Greensborough - Apollo Parkways

Greensborough - Apollo Parkways is at the southern most part of the Plenty Gorge and has been assessed as having a VERY HIGH to EXTREME bushfire risk by the Victorian Fire Risk Register.

Greensborough residents should refer to the Greensborough - Apollo Parkways Community Information Guide or alternatively contact the VicEmergency Hotline.

Get your Fire Ready Kit today!

The CFA Fire Ready Kit helps you to understand your risk, prepare your property and develop a bushfire plan. Get the CFA Fire Ready Kit online or contact the Victoria Bushfire Information Line (1800 226 226).

Fire Danger Period

The Fire Danger Period is declared by the CFA for each municipality based on the conditions of the area.

To learn more about the Fire Danger Period visit the CFA website.

Total Fire Bans

Total Fire Bans are declared by district. Banyule is located in the CENTRAL DISTRICT.

To find out what you can and can’t do during fire danger periods and Total Fire Bans go to the CFA website or call the Victoria Bushfire Information Line (1800 226 226).

No fires are permitted within the open air on days of Total Fire Ban. Some exemptions do apply, however you will require a permit. Contact your local CFA District Office or CFA headquarters on 9262 8444 for more information.

VicEmergency Hotline

Call 1800 226 226 or 1800 555 667 (National Relay Service) for more information on:

  • Major bushfires (during and after).
  • Total fire bans and fire restrictions.
  • Key bushfire preparation and planning.
  • Program, publication and services available.
  • Bushfire safety messages.
  • Current fire danger ratings.
  • Community meeting.

Fire Danger Rating

Click on each of the Fire Danger Ratings listed to find our what they mean and what you should do.

Code Red
What does it mean?

These are the worst conditions for a bush or grass fire. Homes are not designed or constructed to withstand fires in these conditions.

The safest place to be is away from high risk bushfire areas.

What should I do?

  • Leaving high risk bushfire areas the night before or early in the day is your safest option - do not wait and see. Avoid forested areas, thick bush or long, dry grass.
  • Know your trigger - make a decision about:
  • when you will leave
  • where you will go
  • how you will get there
  • when you will return
  • what will you do if you cannot leave

Extreme
What does it mean?

Expect extremely hot, dry and windy conditions.

If a fire starts and takes hold, it will be uncontrollable, unpredictable and fast moving. Spot fires will start, move quickly and come from many directions.

Homes that are situated and constructed or modified to withstand a bushfire, that are well prepared and actively defended, may provide safety. You must be physically and mentally prepared to defend in these conditions.

What should I do?

  • Consider staying with your property only if you are prepared to the highest level. This means your home needs to be situated and constructed or modified to withstand a bushfire, you are well prepared and you can actively defend your home if a fire starts
  • If you are not prepared to the highest level, leaving high risk bushfire areas early in the day is your safest option.
  • Be aware of local conditions and seek information by listening to your emergency broadcasters, go to cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226

Severe
What does it mean?

Expect hot, dry and possibly windy conditions.

If a fire starts and takes hold, it may be uncontrollable.

Well prepared homes that are actively defended can provide safety. You must be physically and mentally prepared to defend in these conditions.

What should I do?

  • Well prepared homes that are actively defended can provide safety - check your bushfire survival plan.
  • If you are not prepared, leaving bushfire prone areas early in the day is your safest option.
  • Be aware of local conditions and seek information by listening to your emergency broadcasters, go to cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

Very High, High or Low-Moderate
What does it mean?

If a fire starts, it can most likely be controlled in these conditions and homes can provide safety.

Be aware of how fires can start and minimise the risk.

Controlled burning off may occur in these conditions if it is safe - check to see if permits apply.

What should I do?

  • Check your bushfire survival plan.
  • Monitor conditions.
  • Action may be needed.
  • Leave if necessary.

What to do

Before

  • Determine if you're in a high risk bushfire area, e.g. near where suburbs meet bush and grassland.
  • Use the Household Bushfire Self-Assessment Tool to assess your property risk level.
  • Stay aware of the Fire Danger Rating. LEAVING EARLY IS ALWAYS THE SAFEST OPTION.
  • Get a Fire Ready Kit, including Leaving Early Bushfire Survival Planning Template
  • Attend a CFA Fire Ready Victoria briefing in your local area.
  • Prepare your property and household considering family, livestock and pets.
  • Decide what important items you want to take with you if you need to evacuate.
  • Check you have adequate building and content insurance.
  • Get to know your neighbours and those who may need extra help, e.g. those with a disability.

During

  • Implement the bushfire survival requirements of your home emergency plan.
  • Continue to stay informed and monitor conditions.
  • Be prepared to evacuate.
  • LEAVING EARLY IS ALWAYS THE SAFEST OPTION. Always follow advice provided by emergency services. If you have lost this option due to imminent fire threat, consider taking shelter in a well prepared home or move further away from the fire threat, e.g. further into the urban area.
    YOUR SAFETY IS NOT GUARANTEED.
  • If you have time, check your neighbours are monitoring the situation.
  • If you are suffering smoke exposure, seek medical advice or call NURSE-ON-CALL 1300 606 024.
  • Contact a family member or friend and tell them what you plan to do now.

After

  • Listen to ABC radio or other emergency broadcasters for updates.
  • For relief and recovery information contact Banyule City Council (9490 4222), the Victorian Bushfire Emergency Information Line or the Victorian Emergency Recovery Information Line (1300 799 232)
  • Contact your insurance company immediately and take photos of damage.
  • Be aware of road hazards like debris and damaged roads, bridges and power lines.
  • Burnt buildings can leave potential hazards such as asbestos, ashes (especially from treated timbers) and damaged electrical wiring. Follow the advice of the Department of Health and Human Services to reduce risk of injury and illness.
  • For financial assistance to help ease the personal hardship call the Victorian Emergency Recovery Information Line (1300 799 232).
  • Check on your neighbours and contact family and friends to let them know you are ok.

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